CS70 Network Fundamentals & Architecture

David Morgan
Santa Monica College
see syllabus for email address


Administrativa

Syllabus

Grade information

Reading list, per chapter:
 6th edition
 5th edition

Course outline

SMC dates/deadlines


DETER net testbed
  home
  get/use an account
  FAQ
  tutorial
  news report (pbs)


Information

Textbook's website

RFC lookup

Remote Unix access with ssh

Fundamental Unix Commands

Protocols: non-cyber examples

MAC address assignments
 - listing
 - search

TCP/IP - Intro to the IP Protocols

TCP/IP Pocket
Reference Guide
 - IPv4 version
 - IPv6 version

Wireshark doc
html   pdf

IP addresses

IP packet delivery

Network calculators:
  here's one
  and another
  and a third

Real world DSL
  - a DSL order
 -
Analysis

commercial routers

Windows networking
 
WindowsNetworking
 Practically networked

Linux Network Administrator's Guide

Playing client
with telnet and netcat

Sockets: socket programming

Client/server sample:
 general architecture
 source code:
 - echoserver.c
 - echoclient.c
 executables (fedora15):
  echoprograms-f15.zip

Sockets: sample programs
 - letter-upgrader server
 - letter-upgrader's client

 - upper-echoback server
 - client for echo-back server

 - web (file-send) server
 - client for file-send server

nmap: Ethical Hacker article

VPN article

Protocols

ARP

IP

ICMP

TCP

UDP

echo (port 7)

discard (port 9)

chargen (port 19)


Slide presentations
(miscellaneous - see
course outline for
mainstream slides)

Concepts

Design

Media

NICs

Access technologies (Chs. 12+16 abridged)

Wires, hubs, switches

bridging

dhcpd (address server)

DHCP protocol

Samba (MS fileshare client) 

SMB (MS fileshare) protocol

stunnel

Networks: miscellaneous essentials

Networks: modems & Point-to-Point Protocol

Networks: firewalls

Narrated slide presentations

internetworks  (33MB)

ping  (16MB)

 

SPRING 2018
Section 1721  9:00a - 12:05p Sat Bus 263

This Website (http://homepage.smc.edu/morgan_david/)  will be used extensively to communicate with you. Announcements, grade reports, and assignments will be posted here. Please access the website from any SMC computer lab. Alternatively, it can be viewed from an internet-connected browser anywhere. You are responsible for awareness of the information posted here.

Homework - 
see/do - the homework column of course outline, section 4 ("ethernet frames"). due on sputnik in the "assignments" subdirectory of your home directory end-of-day Tuesday 3/6
read - readings shown in the course outline through section 4; also read forward to succeeding sections as you have time, to prepare for upcoming topics.
listen - to Bob Metcalfe talk about inventing ethernet.
(2/24)

RFC process - how protocols get created. Here is a current example, HTTP 2 which was published as an RFC in May, 2015. See in particular the development timeline that has led it to this point. (2/24)

Screenshot of Microsoft Network Monitor courtesy of a former student. Compare the interface with Wireshark's.

 

Course outline - with approximate weekly topic coverage corresponded to related readings, homework assignments, and in-class slides I will use.

Homework - 
do the reading and homework shown in the "Reading" and "Homework" columns of the course outline's topic #1.

Cover art on Tannenbaum textbook:

What is it??

"Number please?" asks the switchboard operator. The switchboard is a board. It's for switching. Switching changes a circuit between you and somebody. It can complete a circuit to your Aunt Bheulah in Iowa City so you can thank her for the knit socks. After you hang up if you want to call your uncle in Waco you'll need to switch circuits, to get a circuit to him instead of her. That's what the operator does for you. The "switch"ing in "switch"board is circuit switching. Nowadays in computer networks it's not circuit switching anymore, it's packet switching.

 

Functional layering - the famous "Open Systems Interconnect" model is depicted below. Somebody once had the idea that maybe there could be a way to get independent computer systems of different types to be able to exchange information with one another. The diagram blueprints the idea for "how in the world are we going to make that work??" That idea is the subject of this course.


First-day administrative information you will need to know:

Handout - explaining use of class computers.

A Remote Unix system account will be created for you.

Distributing files from sputnik to the class as a whole,  publicly - the above file transfer discussion describes file movement to and from your own home directory, exclusive to you. Sometimes I will want to have someplace to put a file so everybody can get to it and download it. When I do that, here's how to download them.

Using ssh (secure shell). ssh is an important tool you will use for interacting with remote computers. For that you will need an ssh client. There are a number of ssh client alternatives.

Running linux at home.

Slides available online - for most if not all slides I will show in class. Links to them can be found in the "Slides" column of the course outline.

Course-long textbook reading - a chapter-by-chapter list ( 6th edition, 5th edition ). The textbook is divided into chapters and they in turn into numbered sections. The list tells you which sections to read for this course when chapters are assigned. For example if I assigned chapter 10 and it had 17 sections, if this list specifies "10.1-100.5, 10.7, 10.12-17" it means I didn't feel sections 10.6 nor 10.8-11 were relevant enough so I only list the balance of the chapter. Read unlisted portions for your own interest if you wish, but the listed sections are what's officially assigned to you.

Textbook - Computer Networks and Internets, sixth edition, Douglas Comer, Pearson Prentice Hall , 2015.

Wireshark - is an excellent free packet capture utility. What is a packet, and why caputre it? We'll talk about that later. I will ask you to install and use Wireshark later in the semester, assuming you have a linux or windows computer available on which to do so. Please visit Wireshark's home page.

Opportunity - I'm happy to tell you that as a class we have the fortunate invitation to use a network testbed facility operated by USC/ISI called DETER. I will request individual DETER accounts for you; when they are created you will get an email message with info and credentials. In class I will describe DETER and how we will use it. This will come some weeks into the semester. In the meantime, you can explore the links under the heading "DETER net testbed" at left if you like.


 

"What hath God wrought?"
May 24, 1844

"Mr. Watson come here, I want to see you."
March 10, 1876

"lo"
October 29, 1969